Saturday, 21 May 2016

Old Fashion Embroidery with Transfers

This post follows on from yesterday post
For many years I cross-stitched.  I used to test cross-stitch patterns for companies, but my first love is "proper" embroidery.  Working all those glorious stitches with great names, Chain Stitch, Satin Stitch, Running Stitch, French Knots (the first stitch I ever learnt) and lots and lots of other stitches too.  You know, the stitches they are seen on vintage tablecloths and tray cloths and embroidered pictures,  These were mostly worked in the 30's and 40's era from transfers which were purchased and ironed on to linen fabric.  

Sarah of Homespun Stitchworks  wrote a post this morning about these.  This is the pen  I discovered and is mentioned in Sarah's post



all you do is find a picture or an old transfer you like a photo-copy it onto plain paper, remembering if words are on the transfer they must be in reverse or mirror image otherwise they will come out wrong on the transfer.  After you have printed out, turn the paper over and hold up to the light, if it looks correct go over the photo-copy with the pen and iron onto a pure cotton or linen fabric.  If you are not sure if the transfer has transferred.  Being very careful not to move the paper lift one corner, and look.  Go over with the iron again if feint.  I actually use my iron on the steam setting, but you can use a dry iron too. 


The transfer ready to be stitched


Stitch the pattern however you wish


Place the finished embroidery inside one of those laundry bags and pin the corners and the sides.  This can be put in with your normal everyday washing.  I find machine washing gives better results. 
Putting your embroidered piece in a bag stops the raw edge fraying, and  pinning it in stops it being screwed up in the corner of the bag.


When the wash cycle has finished, take out lay face down on the ironing board and iron whilst still damp. Then place somewhere flat to air off.


Also following on from yesterdays post I stitched this for my mother thirty years ago whilst pregnant.  It has been washed and ironed many many times


7 comments:

  1. That pen is a great idea! I think I will need to get one of those at some point. Great tips on washing the embroideries too! Your free hand embroidery is so beautiful Julie. You are very talented. x

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  2. That is a brilliant idea! I really like this!

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  3. Super tips you have shared, thank you.

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  4. I use a similar method, it is very convenient. Thanks for sharing.
    Amalia
    xo

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  5. As a little girl I spent hours embroidering. I could do all the stitches you mention but having not attempted them for years I’ve forgotten how to do any of them. I still have some of the things I made in the 1950s and a couple of things made by my mum. When my little granddaughters came over from Australia at Christmas, I made them both a dressing up cloak, and it was only then I realised I could no longer embroider. Maybe I should go to a few classes now that I’ve retired. Thanks for the memories.

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  6. As a little girl I spent hours embroidering. I could do all the stitches you mention but having not attempted them for years I’ve forgotten how to do any of them. I still have some of the things I made in the 1950s and a couple of things made by my mum. When my little granddaughters came over from Australia at Christmas, I made them both a dressing up cloak, and it was only then I realised I could no longer embroider. Maybe I should go to a few classes now that I’ve retired. Thanks for the memories.

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  7. Lovely embroidery, and great tips! The new pen opens up lots of possibilities! Happy week Julie.
    Helen xox

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